McIntyre Direct

Media Options: A checklist of nontraditional media options for prospecting:
October 1, 2006

Web: search, paid, organic • E-mail lists (primarily available in B-to-B; few usable consumer e-mail lists are available) • Web ads (individual opportunities, often not scalable) • Affiliate programs • Price comparison search engines Offline media: electronic • DRTV (large volumes when it works) • Radio and TV spots • Outbound telemarketing (B-to-B still most viable) Offline media: print • Direct mail: Solo packages (need a “hero” product) Self-mailers and postcards (lead generation, especially useful for B-to-B) • Insert media: Package, targeted Statement, mass distribution Co-op media, mass distribution Card packs, lead generation • Space ads for lead generation

The Catalog Doctor: Profit Prescriptions for Product Density
October 1, 2006

One of the most-asked questions I get is, “What product density is right for my catalog?” There are two main drivers to finding your appropriate product density (or the average number of products per page): your brand and your square inch sales report. Brand. In general — but not in every case — the more upscale the brand, the lower the product density; the more downscale the brand, the higher the product density. So if you’re starting a new catalog and have no idea what density to use, look at competitive catalogs (or noncompetitors who sell to your audience), and take your cue

The Catalog Doctor: Marketing Remedies for Multichannel Profits (Extended, Web-only Version)
August 1, 2006

Do your photos look off-kilter? Is your printed catalog not as vibrant as it used to be? Is your image quality erratic? Just as good design and good copy increase sales, good image quality with bright, true colors will improve sales for most catalogs. But since the switch from film to digital photography, many catalogers have experienced inconsistencies or a decline in image quality. Digital doesn’t mean you have to accept lower image quality. You can capture and print great digital images, but you need to understand how to manage the digital process. Why Is My Catalog Dull and Gray? Problem: All

Catalog Doctor: Digital Remedies for Print Profits
August 1, 2006

We’ve refocused the Chronicles/Adventures in Cataloging column to a “problem/remedy” format and renamed it The Catalog Doctor. Do your photos look off-kilter? Is your printed catalog not as vibrant as it used to be? Is your image quality erratic? Just as good design and good copy increase sales, good image quality with bright, true colors will improve sales for most catalogs. Since the switch from film to digital photography, many catalogers have experienced inconsistencies or a decline in image quality. Digital doesn’t mean you have to accept lower image quality. You can capture and print great digital images, but you

The Catalog Doctor Marketing Remedies for Multichannel Pro
August 1, 2006

Increase profits by improving your digital imaging process. Do your photos look off-kilter? Is your printed catalog not as vibrant as it used to be? Is your image quality erratic? Just as good design and good copy increase sales, good image quality with bright, true colors will improve sales for most catalogs. But since the switch from film to digital photography, many catalogers have experienced inconsistencies or a decline in image quality. Digital doesn't mean you have to accept lower image quality. You can capture and print great digital images, but you need to

Chronicles Put the Rooster Tile Near the Chicken Towel
April 1, 2006

By Susan J. McIntyre Secrets of successful pagination. Pagination, deciding what products go where in your catalog, is both an art and a science. Paginating can be complex and confusing. But understanding some basic principles can help unravel the mystery. Easy to Find = Easy to Sell A product on your catalog's back cover is easy to find, because the customer will see it without opening the book. Let's say a product will sell 30 percent better on the back cover than on a random inside page. Which product would you prefer to get a 30 percent lift: a $1,000-revenue product or

Eight Lessons You Can Learn From a Matchback
March 1, 2006

As a direct marketer, you have the advantage of measuring your successes (and unfortunately sometimes your mistakes) in ways that general advertising cannot. You meticulously test, code, track and analyze the results of your prospecting efforts. Such tactics have generated accurate metrics that helped guide you in meaningful directions. At least until recently. Today, knowing from where your orders and customers hail has become increasingly difficult. It’s the rare direct marketer who can survive in a single marketing channel, and most have at least two channels: catalog and Internet. Add retail locations, special mailings and opt-in e-mail campaigns, and the task of tracking sales and

Special Report Matchbacks
March 1, 2006

By Terrell Sellix A matchback is the process of matching order records back to mailing-tape records to determine the actual source of those orders. Matchbacks have been used for years on a limited basis to try to pinpoint the source of unknown orders: typically 5 percent to 20 percent of orders. With the advent of the Web and the increase in multichannel marketing, understanding where your orders and customers are coming from has become harder to learn — and yet more critical to know — than ever. The shift has brought matchbacks into the limelight of customer order-tracking and results analysis. This Special

Special Report Matchbacks
March 1, 2006

By Terrell Sellix A matchback is the process of matching order records back to mailing-tape records to determine the actual source of those orders. Matchbacks have been used for years on a limited basis to try to pinpoint the source of unknown orders: typically 5 percent to 20 percent of orders. With the advent of the Web and the increase in multichannel marketing, understanding where your orders and customers are coming from has become harder to learn — and yet more critical to know — than ever. The shift has brought matchbacks into the limelight of customer order-tracking and results analysis. This Special

Matchback Do’s and Don’ts
March 1, 2006

The right steps for successful matchbacks differ only in their complexity of rules, priorities and match criteria. Not surprisingly, the rules applied get increasingly more complex the more contact pieces you have in the mail at one time. Therefore, well thought-out criteria are critical in maximizing the usefulness of the matchback process. Do gather relevant data from your matchback vendor. Include in your file appropriate sales data such as name, address and customer number. Also include all order information such as date of purchase; order total with or without shipping (depending on how you typically do your reporting); and product information if you plan