Leon Henry Inc.

The Power of Inserts (914 words)
February 1, 2003

By Debra Goldstein More and more catalogers are discovering this winning method of increasing revenue. Package inserts, catalog blow-ins, ride-alongs and statement stuffers — these are just a few of the ways catalogers are generating additional revenue. By creating profit centers through various insert media, catalogers are taking advantage of the current climate in which every dollar counts. They're creating larger pools of opportunities for themselves, in addition to instituting programs that benefit their insert advertisers. The usual published rates for a cataloger's package-insert program range from $50 to $60/M, while catalog blow-ins generally are priced from $25 to $35/M. There are about

The Power of Inserts
February 1, 2003

Package inserts, catalog blow-ins, ride-alongs and statement stuffers — these are just a few of the ways catalogers are generating additional revenue. By creating profit centers through various insert media, catalogers are taking advantage of the current climate in which every dollar counts. They’re creating larger pools of opportunities for themselves, in addition to instituting programs that benefit their insert advertisers. The usual published rates for a cataloger’s package-insert program range from $50 to $60/M, while catalog blow-ins generally are priced from $25 to $35/M. There are about 1,200 insert programs on the market, of which more than 400 are catalog-related. What to

The Team Approach
September 1, 2002

Despite a rocky 2002 economy, catalogers are forging ahead, turning their attention to new manufacturing practices to support—and, in some cases, supplement—their sales efforts. Order forms aren’t the only things you’ll find nestled in your favorite catalog these days. Increasingly, catalogers are partnering with third-party mailers to insert advertising into catalog pages. And the ads are taking myriad forms, most commonly as blow-in and bind-in inserts. (Blow-ins are loose ad inserts, while bind-ins are inserts that are bound into the book.) For catalogers, these initiatives often mean extra revenues. And for advertisers, they’re a way of targeting a specific demographic, while the cataloger picks

Catalog Insert Programs - The Team Approach
September 1, 2002

By Gretchen Kirby Peck Advertising-insert programs: How to make them work for your catalog. Despite a rocky 2002 economy, catalogers are forging ahead, turning their attention to new manufacturing practices to support—and, in some cases, supplement—their sales efforts. Order forms aren't the only things you'll find nestled in your favorite catalog these days. Increasingly, catalogers are partnering with third-party mailers to insert advertising into catalog pages. And the ads are taking myriad forms, most commonly as blow-in and bind-in inserts. (Blow-ins are loose ad inserts, while bind-ins are inserts that are bound into the book.) For catalogers, these initiatives often

Catalog Insert Programs - The Team Approach
September 1, 2002

By Gretchen Kirby Peck Advertising-insert programs: How to make them work for your catalog. Despite a rocky 2002 economy, catalogers are forging ahead, turning their attention to new manufacturing practices to support—and, in some cases, supplement—their sales efforts. Order forms aren't the only things you'll find nestled in your favorite catalog these days. Increasingly, catalogers are partnering with third-party mailers to insert advertising into catalog pages. And the ads are taking myriad forms, most commonly as blow-in and bind-in inserts. (Blow-ins are loose ad inserts, while bind-ins are inserts that are bound into the book.) For catalogers, these initiatives often

Find New Customers Without Breaking the Bank
January 1, 2002

You have a slew of choices when trying to reach prospects without paying postage, including direct response space advertising, broadcast and other channels. By Denny Hatch It is imperative to determine the lifetime value of customers by source. Robert Hackett, RRD Direct's vice president of sales, provides the following formula: Lifetime value is a function of frequency of purchase, multiplied by the gross margin, multiplied by the duration of brand loyalty. What can you afford to pay for a new customer? To make that determination, Gary Hennerberg of the Hennerberg Group suggests you take the following steps: --Research customer lifetime value. --Calculate

Find New Customers Without Breaking the Bank
January 1, 2002

You have a slew of choices when trying to reach prospects without paying postage, including direct response space advertising, broadcast and other channels. By Denny Hatch It is imperative to determine the lifetime value of customers by source. Robert Hackett, RRD Direct’s vice president of sales, provides the following formula: Lifetime value is a function of frequency of purchase, multiplied by the gross margin, multiplied by the duration of brand loyalty. What can you afford to pay for a new customer? To make that determination, Gary Hennerberg of the Hennerberg Group suggests you take the following steps: --Research customer lifetime value.