E-mail

E-mail Delivery Rates Improved in First Half of 2006
September 26, 2006

An average of 19.2 percent of commercial e-mail was blocked from consumers’ inboxes between January 2006 and June 2006. But that’s down from 21 percent blocked during the same time last year, according to a report from e-mail solutions company Return Path. Looking at past e-mail delivery numbers, the trend appears to be reversing itself: * 20.7 percent of commercial e-mail was blocked from consumers’ inboxes in all of 2005; * 22 percent was blocked in 2004; * 18.7 percent was blocked in 2003; and * 15 percent was blocked in 2002; Other data revealed by the report: * In the first half

E-coming of Age
September 1, 2006

Over the years, I’ve made plenty of catalog purchases, but rarely simply because I was a catalog business editor. I only turned to catalogs when I needed something unusual or came across a killer sale. Otherwise, I bought my mainstream goods off the rack. Today, that’s changed. And the two vehicles that have impacted me the most have been the coming of age of e-mail and the remarkable ease of search engines. I find e-mail’s impact on me surprising, because less than five years ago, I’d delete any personal e-mail from just about any address I didn’t recognize. But now, I find myself looking

E-mail Marketing: Four E-mail Strategies to Implement NOW
August 29, 2006

While e-mail marketing is nothing new, many catalogers still aren’t using it to its fullest potential, said consultant Reggie Brady, president of Reggie Brady Marketing Solutions in a session at the recent List Vision conference in New York. Following are a few areas Brady feels that catalogers should improve upon. * Send triggered messages. If customers try to put items in their carts that are out of stock, first tell them the products aren’t available; then e-mail them when the products are back in stock, Brady advised. E-mails sent a few days after an abandoned shopping cart also are important because customers tend to comparison

Online Marketing: What Matters Most
July 25, 2006

Ask Amy Africa--the Web usability surveyor and president of Eight By Eight, which consults for such B-to-B catalogers as VWR, S&S Worldwide and Hello Direct--and she’ll tell you there are really only a handful of things that matter when it comes to online marketing. During her keynote address at the recent MeritDirect Business Mailer’s Co-op Conference in White Plains, N.Y., she outlined the following pieces of online marketing that matter. Landing/entry page: Armed with her own survey findings, Africa said that 80 percent to 90 percent of people leave landing pages (upon coming from search engine sites) within five pages of the landing pages. “Landing

Majority of Marketing Managers Practice Integrated Marketing
July 11, 2006

Seventy percent of marketing decision makers report that their organizations currently practice integrated marketing, a marketing plan that coordinates online and offline marketing efforts, according to the “B-to-B eMarketing Survey” released last month by marketing services provider Epsilon. The survey of 175 U.S.-based marketing executives also revealed the following: * 70 percent of companies report that the same person controls both traditional and interactive marketing budgets. * 46 percent allocate marketing budgets by channel using rough estimates based on past experience. * 23 percent allocate marketing budgets by channel using modeling and planning techniques. * 19 percent give each channel a fixed allocation. *

CS0706_GILBERT
May 18, 2006

Seventy percent of marketing decision makers report that their organizations currently practice integrated marketing, a marketing plan that coordinates online and offline marketing efforts, according to the “B-to-B eMarketing Survey” released last month by marketing services provider Epsilon. The survey of 175 U.S.-based marketing executives also revealed the following: * 70 percent of companies report […]

By the Stats: Benchmark Your E-mail Program Against Industry Opt-out Statistics
April 11, 2006

Eighty-two percent of catalog and online merchants with active e-mail programs remove customers from their e-mail lists immediately upon request, according to a study of opt-out practices conducted by e-mail marketer Silverpop. Here are other findings from the study: * 8 percent of merchants continued to send e-mail beyond the 10-business-day limit set by Can-Spam. * 6 percent of merchants took up to five days to handle opt-outs. * 4 percent took between five and 10 days. * 67 percent of merchants use the term”unsubscribe” to describe the opt-out procedure to customers. * 18 percent use alternate wording. * 13 percent use the term

E-commerce: Tactics for Developing Customer Loyalty to Your Web Site
March 14, 2006

Those e-merchants who can save customers time and/or make online shopping easier are in line to build customer loyalty, writes Ken Burke, founder and chief executive of MarketLive and author of “Intelligent Selling: The Art& Science of Selling Online.” Following are four action steps to take: 1. Offer advanced search. “Searches that use Boolean operators and multiple keywords can be powerful ways to allow experienced users to find what they want more quickly,” Burke writes. And it can incentivize shoppers to visit your site vs. a competitor’s site. 2. Send e-mail confirmations. Detail what they bought, total cost and shipping data, Burke suggests. 3.

By the Stats: E-mail Influence on Holiday Purchases Up 10 Percent From 2004
March 7, 2006

Almost 50 percent of consumers said that e-mail had at least some influence on their online purchases this past holiday season, a 10 percent increase from 2004, according to the Annual Holiday E-mail Consumer Survey, released in January by e-mail marketer Return Path. Comparatively, the survey showed 42 percent of consumers claim e-mail had no impact on their online holiday shopping habits. Other data revealed by the survey: * 50 percent of consumers took advantage of e-mail promotions. * 41 percent used e-mail to comparison shop. * 31 percent got gift ideas from e-mails. * 29 percent went to a retail store as a

By the Stats: E-mail Marketing Spend to Hit $1.1 Billion by 2010
February 21, 2006

E-mail marketing spending will grow at an annual rate of 4.5 percent for the next five years, according to a recently released report from Jupiter Research. Analysts for the research firm expect marketers to spend $1.1 billion on e-mail in 2010, up from $885 million last year. Other information revealed by the report: ¥ Spam e-mails per consumer should drop 13 percent annually to 1,640 pieces in 2010, down from 3,253 pieces last year. ¥ E-mail delivery rates should surpass 90 percent in the next few years, up from an average of 88 percent currently. ¥ Incorrectly blocked e-mail will cost marketers $92 million